You have the space in your yard for a storage or garden shed. You have an idea of where you are going to place it, how you are going to design it and what you are going to put in it, you’re ready to start construction or installation, right?

Building A Shed

Before you go and pull the trigger on a brand new shed, take into account the following 5 considerations to ensure you are making the best decision possible:

Are the sheds on display? Garden sheds come in many different styles and qualities so it is important, if you are getting something pre-fabricated, that you have the opportunity to see and examine the structural integrity and craftsmanship of what you are buying beforehand.

Many home improvement and renovation stores will have assembled versions of the sheds they offer on display so you can be sure that you are spending money on something you are actually going to want and use.

What kind of timber and cladding are you working with? The quality of the timber used in the construction of your garden shed, whether by you, if you are building it yourself, or by a professional shed company, comprises a large amount of the cost and will determine how long and how well the structure stands up to the elements and wear and tear. Redwoods generally last longer because they are able to retain more sap and therefore generally don’t dry out and fall apart as much as white woods do.

What kind of flooring are you going with? Many cheap, prefabricated floor boards are made from chip board, oriental strand board, wafer board or cheap plywood. The problem with all of these materials is that they are very poorly suited to life outdoors and will begin to rot and disintegrate as soon any moisture creeps in, which can ultimately spell the end for your shed.

If you are taking care of the construction yourself, purchase materials that will hold up under wet weather. If you are buying something prefab, make sure the company whose product you are buying uses the same.

How thick do you want your framing? Framing thickness is directly related to the overall strength of the building. You should be considering a thickness of no less than 2” x 2” so your building will be able to hold up under the harshest seasonal conditions.

Do you know the internal and external heights? Again, if you are buying something prefabricated, make sure that the measurements indicate both the height inside and outside of the structure. The measurements of some prefabricated units are misleading and you can end up purchasing something that doesn’t give you any room to stand in once it’s up.

Conversely, if you are building something on your own, make sure while you are building to check that you are giving yourself enough room to actually move around inside.

As with anything that seems simple, there are always some common sense considerations that might escape us if we are inexperienced or unsure about what we are actually getting ourselves into. Asking ourselves the above questions when building our garden shed will ensure that we end up with something that looks good, lasts long and won’t require constant maintenance and renovating.