A shed is not just something functional that you keep in your yard for storage, it has to look right and fit with the theme of the yard and your home. It also has to be built from a material that will stand up to the elements, and be well suited for the region of the country that you live in. If you are in the market for a new garden shed, or are looking to build your own from scratch, below are some tips for helping you choose the right wood for your garden shed.

Choosing The Right Wood For Your Shed

Cedar and Western Red

These are incredibly popular woods that are often chosen both for their durability and for how well they stand up to decay. This is due in large part to the resistance and the density of the lumber’s heartwood, the core layer of the lumber.

Cypress

Cypress is a great wood, like cedar and western red, for its ability to stand up to decay, but also because it is aesthetically appealing. The red hue is sought by many homeowners because of how attractive it is, and it is also widely recognized for being able to hold paint much better than other types of wood. If the paint job on your shed is really important to you, this should be one of your main considerations.

Pines

Pine is known for its excellent workability, and is often pressure treated for outdoor use. Southern pines are very strong, but not as good when it comes to decay and warp resistance. They are harder than other pines, but will not hold up as well in climates that receive a lot of moisture and humidity year round.

Poplar

This is a moderately strong wood that is capable of resisting decay and warping.

Redwood

This is considered to be one of the most premium construction materials because it is durable, resists decay, and is one of the most beautiful species of tree in North America. Because of this it is quite expensive and sought after, but most builders will attest to just how well rounded and versatile this wood is.

Choosing the right lumber for your shed means knowing how to select for the climate you live in and the look you are going for. If you are not worried about decay, then certain woods will be better than others. If, however, your main goal is building something that will stand up to inclement weather, big storms and tough winters, you need to factor in how well certain woods are able to resist the elements.